Planning and Development

Learn What The ADU Draft Ordinance Includes and Next Steps

In an effort to explore options to help fill the shortfall of attainable and age-friendly housing in Colorado Springs (identified in previous housing needs assessments and through the public process that resulted in the City’s new comprehensive plan – PlanCOS) the City Planning and Community Development Department recently proposed an ordinance to expand the use of accessory dwelling units (ADUs), or in-law units, to single-family zoned districts. Because the proposal has been met with some public concern City planners are slowing down the process to schedule additional City Council work sessions in order for the council and city staff to consider and respond to resident comments.

City Planning will update the draft ordinance both based on input from the public and preliminary discussion with City Council. As this work continues, we would like to provide some basic information about the draft ADU ordinance and address some of the common concerns we’ve been hearing so far.

More information and updates on the proposed ordinance as it moves forward will be posted on ColoradoSprings.gov/ADU, along with upcoming public meeting dates as they are scheduled.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an ADU?

Accessory Dwelling Units are secondary living areas on a residential lot or within the main home. ADUs are often referred to as ancillary apartments, mother-in-law suites or cottages, granny flats, or guesthouses. These residential units are smaller than the main home and include a sleeping area, bathrooms, and kitchens. Accessory dwelling units can come in a number of forms, such as:

  • Above a detached garage
  • A separate structure in the backyard
  • Attached to the main home
  • A converted basement or attic

City Planning is proposing two types of ADUs, defined as “integrated” and “detached” units for some single-family residential zones in Colorado Springs. Both types are currently allowed in “two-family” and “multi-family” zone districts.

Why is the City proposing to expand ADUs in Colorado Springs?

The City has allowed detached ADUs, in much of Colorado Spring since 2003, although only allowed in multi-family zone districts.  Because the need to provide housing to aging parents, dependent or disabled adult children or other family members should not be limited to those within the allowed zone districts, the City is proposing to expand this type of housing to additional residential zones throughout Colorado Springs. 

Expanding the use of ADUs in single-family zoned neighborhoods will give property owners in more residential zone districts the same opportunity to provide accessible, and semi-independent, housing for family members.

It could also allow property owners to add an ADU as an investment opportunity, however, the homeowner must live on the property as his/her primary residence.  Read more on that below.

Does it apply to me?

There are several different types of single-family zoned districts interspersed throughout Colorado Springs, but the ordinance will not expand to all of them. The proposed ordinance extends to R1-6, R1-9, R, OC and OR (commercial with residential use). Because properties in PUD, or Planned Use Development, have specific requirements for density that would need to be addressed before including in the ordinance they are not eligible to add this type of dwelling at this time. You can find instructions on finding your home’s zoning district in the FAQs at ColoradoSprings.gov/ADU

The proposed changes to City code do not override private covenants.  The ordinance does not override those covenants that already prohibit accessory dwellings or structures.  HOAs and neighborhoods that do not have covenants or that existing covenants do not address accessory dwellings or structures, may still opt to adopt or amend those covenants to prohibit accessory dwelling units. Please check with your HOA for more information. 

Can major hotel chains take over short-term rentals in Colorado Springs?

Although this issue relates to short-term rentals, it is important to address. If a large company or hotel-owned properties operate short term rentals (STRs), they would be subject to the same regulations as individual applicants/management companies/property owners. For example, if a large hotel chain bought a property in an R1-6000 zoning district, they would be restricted to utilize the property as single household, just as any private resident would be, and would not be permitted to run a standard, typical hotel and/or motel on said property per established zoning regulations. Though, like any property owner in the same zone district, they would be able to pull one STR permit for one short term rental.  They would also have to maintain the local 24-hour emergency contact.

Anticipated impact on single-family neighborhoods

Increased density

One common comment heard is that allowing ADUs in single-family residential neighborhoods will change the character of such neighborhoods.  City planners recognize that preserving the feel and character of neighborhoods is very important to residents.  It is important to note that ADUs must meet all required setbacks, lot coverage and must be architecturally consistent with the main house.  The fact remains, that the City of Colorado Springs and the Pike Peak region as a whole, is projected to grow in population.  Again, ADUs are one – albeit small – method of providing housing various housing options for our growing population.  Although it is reasonable to assume that there will be more people living in areas where ADUs are built, studies and real-life examples illustrate that even very moderate increases in residential densities have positive effects on cities by making neighborhoods more lively, increasing opportunities for neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. services such as coffee shops and markets, improve opportunities for mass transit, and reducing vehicles trips.

Architectural integrity

A part of the ADU standards for architectural compatibility states, “In the expanded zone districts an accessory dwelling unit shall be designed to maintain the architectural design, style, appearance and character of the principal structure or principal structures in the vicinity. Consistent elements may include façades, roof pitches, siding, eaves, and window treatments or a combination of other elements approved by city staff. The City does not regulate colors of homes, even in the historic preservation overlay, but may consider color as a ‘consistent element.’”

ADUs help maintain affordability and people aging in place

ADUs have long been a part of historic neighborhoods in Colorado Springs as they served to help to maintain affordable housing options in their community, facilitate multi-generational families and people aging in place. Expanding this use to single-family zones will allow those areas to take advantage of the same benefits and can provide a modest number of housing options to meet different income levels and family needs.

Homeowner must occupy one property

In single-family zones, the property owner is required to occupy either the principal home or the ADU as their primary residence. Exceptions may be made for deployments or other qualifying life events. This is different from properties zoned as “two-family” or “multi-family," which can rent out both the main house and the ADU. Additionally, City Planning proposed that ADUs maintain an internal connection with the primary home, which is not required in multi-family zones.

Although short-term rentals are allowed in single-family zones, they have different permitting requirements than ADUs. Homeowners can use the house or the ADU for short term rental purposes, however, the requirements are stricter for single-family properties with an ADU in that the property owner must live in one of the dwellings. A homeowner is allowed to rent the ADU to a “long-term” tenant and rent a bedroom or their home as a short-term rental as well.  One of the topics to be reviewed by the City Council is the relationship between short-term rental and ADU regulations. 

Off-street parking required in draft ordinance

Single-family zoning does not limit the number of vehicles in a neighborhood or per property. City Code already restricts the percentage of the lot that can be covered with impervious surfaces (such as pavement and structures) depending on zoning and number of floors of the primary residence. This would not change if the ADU ordinance were adopted. The ordinance does, however, require at least one off-street parking stall be dedicated to the ADU to help ease the impact of on-street parking availability.

Size of detached ADUs must be half the size of the primary home or 1250 square feet, whichever is smaller

A detached ADU must be no greater 1250 square feet or 50 percent of the main home’s size, whichever is smaller. An integrated unit may only be 40 percent of the main home’s square footage.

The minimum lot size is still under consideration by the planning department and will be discussed in upcoming council work sessions with the intent of ensuring adequate space to accommodate ADUs in single-family zoned districts. The total number of potential properties hosting an ADU will be limited because not every single-family lot will be large enough to accommodate an ADU and continue to meet all of the zoning requirements such as building setbacks and lot coverage.

ADUs can’t be subdivided and sold

Since the draft ordinance’s inception, there has been language which states that in the zone districts that would allow ADUs, they shall not be sold separately from the principal home, nor shall the lot on which an accessory dwelling unit is situated be subdivided unless the new lot size meets the minimum lot size requirements for each structure. For example, in a zone that requires a minimum 6,000 square-foot lot, the lot could only be subdivided if both the main home and the ADU lots maintained a minimum 6,000 square-foot lot while maintaining additional space for setbacks.

 

More information and updates on the proposed ordinance as it moves forward will be posted on ColoradoSprings.gov/ADU, along with upcoming public meeting dates as they are scheduled.

 

Proposed ordinance to expand use of in-law units

The ordinance seeks to address the community's need for a variety of housing options and the ability to age in place

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The public is invited to attend one of three identical informational meetings to learn about a proposed City ordinance to expand the use of accessory dwelling units (ADUs), or in-law units in Colorado Springs by allowing this use in single-family residential zoned areas.

All meeting times and formats are identical. Open house: 5:30 – 7 p.m. with a short presentation at 6 p.m.

Southeast Colorado Springs
Weds, Feb. 20
Deerfield Hills Community Center
4290 Deerfield Hills Road, 80916

North Colorado Springs
Monday, Feb. 25
Prairie Hills Elementary School, gymnasium
8025 Telegraph Drive, 80920

Central/west Colorado Springs
Tuesday, Feb. 26
City Auditorium
221 East Kiowa Street, 80903

Meeting attendees will have an opportunity to learn about this emerging type of housing adopted by many cities and how it’s designed to address the need for increased housing options in Colorado Springs.

In an effort to mitigate the impact of a tight housing market and increasing rental rates and further advance efforts to be an age-friendly community, Colorado Springs officials are exploring an often overlooked form of housing as a potential solution: the in-law unit.

“Because the need to provide housing to aging parents, dependent or disabled adult children or other family members should not be limited those within the allowed zone districts, the City is proposing to allow this type of housing throughout Colorado Springs,” said Hannah Van Nimwegen, senior planner for the City of Colorado Springs. “Updating the city code to extend this type of housing to single-family residential areas will respond to the growing need expressed by our community to provide a greater variety of housing options at different price points and help facilitate and reflect what is already taking place in Colorado Springs.”

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) are secondary apartments on a residential lot or within the main home. ADUs are often referred to as ancillary apartments, in-law suites or cottages, or guest houses. These residential units are smaller than the main home, and can come in a number of forms, such as above a detached garage, converted attic or basement, separate smaller unit on the property or attached to the home.

An ADU must include a sleeping area, sanitary facilities and kitchen. Property owners who rent or provide living accommodations, but do not meet the above criteria for an ADU will not be affected by the proposed ordinance. Additionally, pre-existing legal ADUs in multi-family and commercial zoned districts will not be affected. The proposed ordinance would not override HOA covenants and HOAs may opt to prohibit ADUs.

The City has adopted best practices from other municipalities to develop the proposed ordinance. For more information about the proposed ordinance and what it entails see the attached fact sheet and visit www.ColoradoSprings.gov/ADU
 

Event dates

Location Deerfield Hills Community Center (map)
4290 Deerfield Hills Rd
Colorado Springs, CO 80916
Date/Time Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location Prairie Hills Elementary School (map)
8025 Telegraph Dr.
Colorado Springs, CO 80920
Date/Time Monday, February 25, 2019 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location City Auditorium (map)
221 East Kiowa Street
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
Date/Time Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Colorado College Robson Arena Community Meeting #2

Focus: Arena Building and Architecture

Colorado College continues work on planning and design of a multi-purpose, best-in-class sustainable sporting event venue as the new home of the CC Tigers Hockey Team and venue for City for Champions events.

Parking for the meeting is available at several areas within the campus as well as on-street. (Lots include: Cornerstone, Armstrong, Southeast Tejon, Wooglins, Central Services, 3D Arts, Dale Street and Numismatic (north side)).

Event dates

Location Cornerstone Art Center (map)
825 N. Cascade Avenue
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
Date/Time Saturday, February 16, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

City Council adopts PlanCOS, City’s first comprehensive plan since 2001

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – City Council took the first step Tuesday to adopt PlanCOS, the City’s first comprehensive plan since 2001. The document will formally go into effect after a second reading of the ordinance on Jan. 22. A guide for the future physical development of Colorado Springs over the next 20 years, the plan is comprised of contributions from thousands of residents citywide and is available to view at coloradosprings.gov/plancos.

The comprehensive plan will be used for three primary purposes (chapter 1, page 12):

  • To review larger and discretionary land use applications;
  • As a guide for city initiatives pertaining to the physical development of the city; and
  • To monitor and adapt where necessary to ensure the city is making continual progress.

“I am proud of the collaborative and community-involved process that created PlanCOS and grateful to the thousands of residents who took time to provide valuable input to help shape this important plan,” said Mayor John Suthers. “PlanCOS will enable Colorado Springs to take advantage of economic opportunities that can create and maintain the very best places to live and conduct business, while also providing excellent quality of life.  Essentially, it positions the city to remain a great place for future generations of Colorado Springs residents to live, work and play.”

The plan is uniquely organized into eight chapters that highlight six vision themes: vibrant neighborhoods, unique places, thriving economy, strong connections, renowned culture and majestic landscapes. These themes were guided by an 18-member steering committee that included city councilors Merv Bennett and Jill Gaebler and more than 90 plan co-creators who participated as informed ambassadors.

Since the project launched in 2016, equitable engagement and receiving input from diverse age groups, ethnic populations, interest groups and residents from all city quadrants was a primary pillar of PlanCOS. As such, the plan includes feedback from seven city-wide open houses, which were hosted by city councilors in July 2018, and two public surveys that combined for more than 5,800 unique responses. The city’s Facebook Live streaming of COSTALKS and Envision COS reached thousands of people, and community input was collected and applied from more than 270 meetings and events, like Heading Southeast.

Expanding Accessory Dwelling Units in Colorado Springs

Update June 21, 2019 - The City Planning and Community Development Department will discuss the proposed ordinance at future City Council Work Sessions in order for the Council and city staff to consider and respond to citizen comments received thus far.

The below information reflects elements of the draft ordinance as recommended by City Planning Commission March 21, however, the ordinance is still under review and elements of it may change before a final vote by City Council. The webpage will be updated when a new proposed ordinance is drafted for City Council review and first reading.

Upcoming Dates to Note

  • City Council Work Session: Monday, June 24, 1 p.m. in Council Chambers (no public comment)
  • City Council 1st Reading: TBA
  • (If the vote passes on first reading) City Council 2nd Reading: TBA

Timeline

  • March: Presentation to City Planning Commission for recommendation to City Council.
  • TBA: Presentation to City Council for consideration of the proposed ordinance (two readings of the ordinance are necessary).
  • TBA: Likely period when ADU Ordinance would take effect (note that City Council can opt to designate an effective date of the ordinance).
  • TBA: Continued citizen outreach, the creation of ADU handout and information, and creation of permit for single-family homeowners.

About ADUs

The City has allowed detached accessory dwelling units (ADUs) in much of the city since 2003, although relegated to zone districts that allow more than one dwelling unit on a property.  Because the need to provide housing to aging parents, dependent or disabled adult children or other family members should not be limited those within the allowed zone districts, the City is proposing to allow this type of housing throughout Colorado Springs. 

Expanding the use of ADUs in single-family zoned neighborhoods will give property owners in all residential zone districts the same opportunity to provide accessible, and semi-independent, housing for family members or as an investment in the property. This ordinance will also loosen some of the strict requirements currently applied to ADUs in multi-family zone districts.

While there is not a “silver bullet” solution to help fill the shortfall of attainable and age-friendly housing, the City planning department is exploring options to help Colorado Springs residents. Accessory Dwelling Units have been identified as an opportunity and tool to:

  1. Add housing stock for families in neighborhoods where new apartment complexes would be difficult to construct while maintaining manageable neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. density
  2. Assist families by helping parents age in place
  3. Assist families with dependent and disabled adult children or other family members in need
  4. Offer additional housing stock at a variety of price points
  5. Assist families with “boomerang children” who may return home
  6. Provide an opportunity homeowners to invest in their property

What is an ADU?

Accessory Dwelling Units are secondary living areas on a residential lot or within the main home. ADUs are often referred to as ancillary apartments, mother-in-law suites or cottages, granny flats, or guesthouses. These residential units are smaller than the main home and include a sleeping area, sanitary facilities, and gas/electrical facilities for cooking. Auxiliary dwelling units can come in a number of forms, such as:

  • Above a detached garage
  • A separate structure in the backyard
  • Attached to the main home
  • A converted basement or attic

    What is currently allowed and what would be different?

      Current Ordinance Proposed Ordinance
    Where ADUs are allowed "Two-family" and "multi-family" zone districts as well as some commercial areas Expand to include "single-family" zone districts. HOAs may opt to prohibit ADUs.
    Parking allowance One off-street parking space No change; one off-street parking space
    ADU Height 25-foot maximum height Dependent on the zone district, roof pitch, and whether the property is adjacent to an alley. 20, 25, or 28 feet
    Maximum ADU size 750 square feet, not including decks or stairs Sized according to the size of the principal home, utilizing a formula of 40% or 50% of the finished floor area of the home up to a maximum of 1,250 square feet. Properties will also be restricted by the maximum allowed building coverage allowed by City Code.
    Minimum lot size 6,000 square feet or 7,000 square feet dependent on the zone district To align with the minimum lot size for a single-family home
    Separation from primary home 20 feet Per building code
    Connectivity between attached units Integrated units currently not allowed in single-family zones In single-family zones, an interior connection between the principal home and the ADU
    Owner occupancy No requirement In single-family zones, the property owner is required to occupy either the principal home or the ADU as their primary residence. Exceptions may be made for deployments or other qualifying life events. If your property is zoned as “two-family” or “multi-family," you can rent out both the main house and the ADU.
    Architecture Not currently regulated

    ADU must be designed to maintain the architectural character of the principal structure or principal structures in the vicinity. An integrated unit cannot propose design modifications to the exterior of the principal structure that indicates their presence from the front of the principal structure including an exterior staircase.

    Frequently Asked Questions

      How do I find my home's zoning district?

      To find the zone of a particular piece of property, you may visit the SpringsView aerial mapping application. Through this application, you can search by property address or Tax Schedule Number to zoom into the property and find the zone district. Definitions for the zoning codes are below as follows:

      • A = Agricultural 
      • R = Estate single-family residential 
      • R1-9 = Single-family residential 
      • R1-6 = Single-family residential 
      • R2 = Two-family residential 
      • R4 = Multi-family residential 
      • R5 = Multi-family residential 
      • SU = Special use 
      • PUD = Planned Unit Development
      • OR = Office residential 
      • OC = Office complex 
      • PBC = Planned business center 
      • C5 = Intermediate business 
      • C6 = General business 
      • PIP1 = Planned industrial park 
      • PIP2 = Planned industrial park 
      • M1 = Light industrial 
      • M2 = Heavy industrial 

      I already have an ADU on my property. How will these changes affect me?

      Pre-existing, legal ADUs in multi-family and commercial zone districts will not be affected.

      Can I split my ADU into its own lot and sell it?

      In the A, R, R-1 9000 and R-1 6000 zone districts, the accessory dwelling unit shall not be sold separately from the principal dwelling unit, nor shall the lot on which an accessory dwelling unit is situated be subdivided unless subdivision is permissible in accordance with all provisions of Article 3 and Article 7 of the zoning code.

      Does the new ordinance override my HOA?

      The proposed changes to City code do not override Community Covenants. HOAs may still opt to prohibit accessory dwelling units through their covenants. Please check with your HOA for more information. 

      Can I post my ADU on a house-sharing site such as AirBNB or VRBO?

      Yes, short-term rentals are allowed in single-family zoned areas and have different permitting requirements than ADUs. Homeowners can use the house or the ADU for short term rental purposes, however, the requirements are more strict for properties with ADU in that the property owner must live in one of the dwellings. A homeowner is allowed to rent the ADU to a “long-term” tenant and rent a bedroom within their home as a short-term rental as well.

      Please see the short term rental webpage for information on permitting requirements.

      What kind of ADU can I build on my property?

      City Planning is proposing two types of ADU, an “integrated” and “detached” units. Both types are currently allowed in “two-family” and “multi-family” zone districts. With the code change, “single-family” zone districts would be allowed to also construct both types of ADU with restrictions based on your property’s zone district, your existing home’s size, and whether your property has access to a public alley.

      Can I use a tiny home, pre-fabricated, or manufactured home as an ADU?

      Yes. However, there are differences between these types of construction requiring different types of permit reviews and inspections. Please contact the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department to discuss permitting requirements. Tiny homes must be attached to a foundation and connected to utilities. A tiny home which is on a trailer cannot be used as a dwelling unit, even if the trailer is skirted; tiny homes to remain on a trailer are permitted within designated campgrounds.

      Can I use a recreational vehicle as an ADU?

      No. City Code does not permit recreational vehicles to be used as permanent residences outside of a designated campground or mobile home park. 

      Does my ADU have to have exterior access?

      No. An “integrated” ADU must provide internal access between the ADU and the main home to maintain the integrity of the one structure. However, it is not required that exterior access is provided unless otherwise required by Fire Code. All exterior accesses to an ADU must be located on the side or to the rear of the home.

      Do I need to tell the City if I'm renting a room to a family member?

      The proposed ordinance will not affect property owners who rent or provide living accommodations that does not meet the definition of an ADU (separate and independent sleeping room, sanitary facilities, and kitchen). However, if the living space being rented to the family member provides the aforementioned facilities and you live in a single-family zone district, you will have to complete and sign an affidavit assuring the homeowner is living on site.

      How will you enforce this ordinance?

      The City's Neighborhood Services Division will field complaints about ADUs. If you suspect an issue during an ADU's construction, please contact the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department

      Am I required to install separate utilities for an ADU?

      A detached ADU may connect to utilities independently or tie into the primary home's utilities. Please contact Colorado Springs Utilities with specific questions. 

      What do I need to do if I want to start building or convert existing space to an ADU?

      1. Contact the Planning and Development Department to see if your property qualifies for an ADU.
      2. Contact your HOA to confirm whether your neighborhood has any covenants which prohibit secondary apartments.
      3. Submit a pre-application meeting request to the Planning and Development Department to meet with a Planner to discuss all applicable regulations, permits, and fees.
      4. Contact the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department to learn more about building permit fees and requirements.

      How do ADUs reflect the desires of our community?

      Expanding the use of ADUs to single-family residential areas has received support and been noted in several city plans including, PlanCOS, the recently adopted comprehensive plan for the city, Age-friendly Colorado Springs, 2019 Community Development Action Plan, the Infill and Redevelopment Action Plan, and others. Additionally, the following boards and commissions have voiced their support: City Planning Commissions, Committee on Aging, Human Relations Commissions, Code Scrub Committee.

      Am I required to build an ADU under this ordinance?

      No. This additional dwelling unit allowance is elective.

        Public Process

        Open Houses

        Public open houses occurred February 20, 25 and 26 of 2019 to present the revised ADU ordinance, answer questions and receive feedback from residents. 

        Expansion Timeline

        • March: Presentation to City Planning Commission for recommendation to City Council.
        • April: Presentation to City Council for consideration of the proposed ordinance (two readings of the ordinance are necessary).
        • May: Likely period when ADU Ordinance would take effect (note that City Council can opt to designate an effective date of the ordinance).
        • June: Continued citizen outreach, the creation of ADU handout and information, and creation of permit for single-family homeowners.


         

         

        Notice of Hearing for Certificate of Designation

        In accordance Colorado Department of Health and Environment’s “Solid Waste Disposal Sites and Facilities Act” (part 1 of article 20 of title 30, Colorado Revised Statutes, and published in the Code of Colorado Regulations at 6 CCR 1007.2, and any subsequent amendment thereto, City Ord. 94-21; Ord 01-42) the below described applications for a Certificate of Designation at the southwest corner of Van Buren Street and Centennial Boulevard is being referred to the City Planning Commission for Consideration on December 20, 2018.

        MVS Centennial is requesting approval of a Certificate of Designation for the cleanup and consolidation of a solid waste disposal site. The existing site is a 17.9 acre landfill, this site would be consolidated into a 3.6 acre landfill of non-hazardous solid waste compacted in place.  No new landfill material will be authorized to be placed onsite.

        For more information regarding the Certificate of Designation application and processing, please reference City Code Section 6.3.101 through 6.3.112.

        For more information regarding the MVS proposal, please contact staff planner Lonna Thelen at 719-385-5383 or lthelen@springsgov.com.

        Posting dates: November 26, 2018 through December 20, 2018

        Southeast Connectivity Meeting Presentation

        View the powerpoint presentation from the Oct. 22 meeting on upcoming construction projects designed to enhance walkability and connectivity in southeast Colorado Springs.

        Download Presentation

        City officials from several departments including Mountain Metro Transit spoke about future projects to address walkability, transportation, and infrastructure to include roadway construction on Academy Boulevard, sidewalk improvements, parks trail connections and public transportation.

        For more information about the meeting, contact Chelsea Gaylord at cgaylord@springsgov.com.

        Invitation to Apply for 2018 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Commercial Façade and Frontage Improvement Funds

        Colorado Springs, Colo. - The City of Colorado Springs Community Development Division, in collaboration with the Colorado Springs Urban Renewal Authority, is pleased to announce that they are soliciting applications for its Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Commercial Façade and Frontage Improvement Grant (CFFIG). The City is making available approximately $100,000 in matching grant funding for eligible commercial building façade and frontages within the Southeast Economic Opportunity Zone. Area map attached.

        The primary purpose of CDBG funds is to serve low- and moderate-income residents who reside within the city limits of Colorado Springs. As a first year pilot program, the Commercial Façade and Frontage Improvement Grant aims to encourage commercial building owners in the Southeast Economic Opportunity Zone (SEEOZ) to invest in improvements along building façade and frontage spaces to increase their utilization as community spaces and aid in attracting and retaining tenants to improve economic opportunities. The Community Development Division and the Colorado Springs Urban Renewal Authority are seeking to fund projects that meet the needs of the community, while also meeting agencies goals. All applications must include a minimum 50% private investment match and request a minimum of $10,000 for total project costs. Property and business owners are invited to apply, provided the proposed improvements will primarily benefit low-income communities.

        Upon completion of this pilot program, Community Development and the Colorado Springs Urban Renewal Authority will evaluate opportunity to extend the Commercial Façade and Frontage Improvement Grant to additional areas of the City.

        The program application and guidelines can be found at the Community Development Division’s website https://coloradosprings.gov/community-development under NeighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. Improvement Programs. One completed application is due no later than 5 p.m. on September 14, 2018 at the Land Use Review Division office at 30 S. Nevada Avenue, Suite 105, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 addressed to Katie Sunderlin, or submitted via email to Katie Sunderlin at sunderka@springsgov.com.

        Applications selected for funding may receive less than the requested amount, depending on the number of applications received and the available funding. By applying, funding is not guaranteed to any agency or project.

        For more information about the application process, please contact:

        Katie Sunderlin at sunderka@springsgov.com or 719-385-5773.

        PlanCOS draft available for public review and input now through Aug. 6

        COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – For the first time since 2001, the City of Colorado Springs, together with City Council, has created a comprehensive plan for the city’s future. The draft of PlanCOS, comprised of contributions from thousands of residents, is now available online for further public review and input through Aug. 6. Also, a series of seven open houses, hosted by city councilors, will be held in July for the public to view and comment on the draft.

        Residents can provide input directly to the online draft, which is translatable into 104 languages, by clicking on the comment buttons placed throughout the webpage. The tool is easy to use and allows the community to provide targeted feedback on specific sections of interest.

        The draft is organized into eight chapters that highlight six vision themes: vibrant neighborhoods, unique places, thriving economy, strong connections, renowned culture and majestic landscapes. Very few comprehensive plans are structured this way.

        “I am very proud of the efforts of everyone who has contributed to PlanCOS, particularly the efforts of city council who not only endorsed its creation, but served as engaging and active leaders on the steering committee,” said Mayor John Suthers. “When we launched this campaign in 2016, we were hoping to receive broad representation from the community, and that’s exactly what happened. This is a guiding and visionary document that will help lead Colorado Springs into a positive, healthy and viable future for generations to come.”

        PlanCOS was guided by an 18-member steering committee comprised of city councilors Merv Bennett and Jill Gaebler as well as broad representation from the community. In addition, a primary pillar of the process has been equitable citizen engagement, soliciting input from diverse age groups, ethnic populations, interest groups and residents from all the city’s quadrants. To accomplish this, multiple high-and low-tech opportunities for data collection were utilized. In addition, more than 55 plan co-creators participated as informed ambassadors throughout the process.

        The PlanCOS draft includes feedback from two public surveys, which received more than 5,800 unique responses combined. The city’s Facebook Live streaming of COSTALKS and Envision COS reached thousands of people, and more than 220 meetings and events were held with various stakeholders, commissions and boards to collect input.

        “To stay true to the intent of PlanCOS, we highly encourage all residents to read the draft plan and share your thoughts,” said Bennett who will co-host one of the seven open houses to inform the public and collect input on PlanCOS. “This is the perfect time to join the conversation and truly help shape the future of our city.”

        The open houses will take place from 6-8 p.m. and are scheduled as follows (any changes to the schedule will be made available on coloradosprings.gov/plancos):

        • July 11: National Cyber Security Center, 3650 N. Nevada Ave. (District 1: Don Knight)
        • July 12: City Auditorium, 221 E. Kiowa St. (At-Large: Merv Bennett, Bill Murray and Tom Strand)
        • July 17: Colorado Springs Police Department Falcon Division, 7850 Goddard St. (District 2: David Geislinger)
        • July 18: Westside Community Center, 1628 W. Bijou St. (District 3: Richard Skorman)
        • July 19: Deerfield Hills Community Center, 4290 Deerfield Hills Rd. (District 4: Yolanda Avila)
        • July 25: Patty Jewett, 900 E. Espanola St. (District 5: Jill Gaebler)
        • July 30: Colorado Springs Police Department Stetson Hills Division, 4110 Tutt Blvd. (District 6: Andy Pico)

        For more information on PlanCOS, visit coloradosprings.gov/plancos.

        Introduction: Implementing and Monitoring

        Most Important Implementation Strategies

        Implementation of PlanCOS is discussed holistically, comprehensively, and in much more detail in Chapter 8. Some of the most important overall implementation strategies are as follows:

        1. Use this Plan and keep a focus on it;
        2. Comprehensively update and refresh our Zoning and Subdivision Code consistent with this Plan;
        3. Comprehensively update our Intermodal Transportation Plan in alignment with this Plan;
        4. Incorporate key priorities in periodic updates of the City’s Strategic Plan;
        5. Complete our neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. planning process and content template and secure resources for the highest priority areas;
        6. Complete Smart Cities pilot projects and move on to implementation; and
        7. Initiate and complete an Attainable HousingAttainable housing means decent, attractive, safe, and sanitary accommodation that is affordable for the full spectrum of the city's residents. While a cost of no more than 30% of gross household income is a good rule of thumb for affordability, there will be some circumstances where higher or lower thresholds may be more applicable. Master PlanA plan for the development of a portion of the city that contains proposed land uses, a generalized transportation system, and the relationship of the area included in the plan to surrounding property..

        Keystone Indicator Tracking

        Plan monitoring and evaluation involves tracking progress and setbacks in accomplishing plan objectives, and determining an appropriate response and effective course of action toward achieving progress. PlanCOS uses these indicators to help clarify existing and desired conditions by measuring key elements and trends. The following keystone indicators will be analyzed annually in order to track the successful implementation of the goals and policies within PlanCOS. Additional information about the indicators is found in Chapter 8: Adaptable Implementation. Each chapter also highlights the most relevant indicators to that vision theme. 

        1. New Residential Net Density
        2. Net City Lane Miles Added Compared with Development and Redevelopment
        3. Number of High Priority Neighborhood Plans Completed
        4. Infill and Redevelopment Activity
          1. Remaining Vacant Acres in Overall Infill Area
          2. Total Building Permit Value in Infill Area
        5. Housing Attainability 
          1. Single Family Home Ownership Affordability Index
          2. Apartment Rental Affordability Index
          3. Total Homeless Populations in El Paso County
        6. Existing Downtown Measures
          1. New Residential Units Added Annually
          2. Value of Building Permit Activity Compared with Prior Years and with the Overall City
        7. Economic Indicators
          1. City Proportion of New Residential Units Added Annually
          2. New Jobs Added that are At or Above the Median Salary for the Region Unemployment Rate
          3. Median Wages Compared with State
        8. Renowned Culture Indicators
          1. Creative Vitality Index
          2. Number of Creative Jobs
          3. Creative Industry Earnings
        9. Majestic Landscapes Indicators
          1. Percent of City Population, Area, And Employment Within ½ Mile of a Park, Trail, or Accessible Open Space Area
          2. Per Capita Total Funding for Parks Operations and Maintenance 
          3. Miles of Urban Trails
          4. Miles of Park Trails
        10. Citywide Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Transit Infrastructure
          1. Walkscore®, Bikescore®, and Transitscore®
          2. Bike Lanes, Bike Boulevards, and Bike Routes