Traffic and Transportation Engineering

Public Meeting for 31st Street Traffic Operations study

The City of Colorado Springs has worked with the local neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. to prepare three alternatives to address concerns for congestion on 31st Street as well as safety concerns at the intersection at Pikes Peak Ave.

The City initiated in February 2019 a traffic study of 31st Street to investigate current traffic operations and develop recommended immediate and long-term improvements to the area.

The team will present its recommendation at this July meeting.

Wed, July 24, 6 p.m.
Rock of Ages Church

120 31st street

For more information about the study, alternatives and public outreach visit www.coloradosprings.gov/31ststreetstudy

Event dates

Location Date/Time Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 5:30pm

Old North End Neighborhood Parking Study

Parking concerns in the Old North End NeighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. are currently being studied for development of a parking program that will meet the needs of residents and businesses in the study area. Options and solutions for parking programs may be varied throughout the study area. For more information, please see the resources below:

Materials included in the Old North End Neighborhood link:

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Contact information

For additional information, please see our Residential Parking Program Page or email trafficeng@springsgov.com

Near North End Neighborhood Parking Study

Parking concerns in the Near North End NeighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. are currently being studied for development of a parking program that will meet the needs of residents and businesses in the study area. Options and solutions for parking programs may be varied throughout the study area. For more information, please see the resources below.

Materials included in the Near North End Neighborhood link:

Public Meeting Dates:

Block Group 1

Thursday, June 20, 2019
 

Block Group 2

Thursday, June 27, 2019
 

Block Group 3

Wednesday, July 17, 2019
 6:00 p.m.
City Administration Building, 30 S Nevada Ave, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Room CAB 102

Block Group 4

Thursday, July 18, 2019
6:00 p.m.
City Administration Building, 30 S Nevada Ave, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Room CAB 102

Block Group 5 and 6

Thursday, July 25, 2019
6:00 p.m.
Penrose Library, 107 N Nevada Ave # 300, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

 Room Columbine B

Contact information

For additional information, please see our Residential Parking Program Page or email trafficeng@springsgov.com

31st Street Traffic Study

Study Overview

Based on feedback and neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. concerns for congestion on 31st Street as well as safety concerns at the intersection at Pikes Peak Ave. the City has initiated a traffic study of 31st Street to investigate current conditions and develop recommended immediate and long-term improvements to the area.

The City objectives for the project include evaluation of elements including:

  • Improve signalized traffic intersection operations of 31st Street at Colorado Blvd and US-24
  • Consider the proposed roundabout at Fontanero Blvd and 31st Street in street operations
  • Safety for bicycles and pedestrians, especially at 31st Street and Pikes Peak.
  • Neighborhood access and traffic impacts

Study Area

31st Street between Highway 24 and W Fontenaro Street.

Alternatives

Strategies were developed and packed as options based on cost considering reductions in traffic congestion and safety for traffic, bicycle, and pedestrians. These proposed options were designed to be compatible with stakeholder input and community development goals and can be interchangeable.

Option 1: Minimal Infrastructure Investment

  • Restripe southbound 31st Street from Echo Lane to US 24
    • Improved operations
    • Improved lane utilization
  • Right-in Right-out at Pikes Peak
    • Improved Safety
    • Provide Bike/Pedestrian Refuge Crossing
  • US-24 Crosswalk
    • Relocate crosswalk to west side of 31st Street to help signal timing and provide consistency for pedestrians

View Option One Alternatives

Option 2: Moderate Investment

  • Construct north/southbound right-turn lanes between Colorado and Hwy 24 for improved operations
  • Reconstruct the Pikes Peak Avenue intersection restricting northbound left-turns onto westbound Pikes Peak Avenue
    • Improved Safety
    • Provide Some Bike/Pedestrian refuge
    • Maintain Southbound-left turns
  • US-24 Crosswalk
    • Relocated crosswalk to west side of 31st to help signal timing and provide consistency for pedestrians.

View Option Two Alternatives

Option 3: Maximum Reliability

  • Construct a Median at Pikes Peak Avenue limiting turns to Right-in Right-out
    • Improved Safety
    • Provide Bike/Pedestrian Median Refuge
  • Construct roundabout at Bijou Street/Echo Lane
    • Improves interaction operation
    • Traffic Calming
    • Maintains Accessibility
  • Add center left-turn lane on 31st Street between Colorado Ave and Highway 24
    • Additional Storage for left-turning vehicles
  • US-24 Crosswalk
    • Relocate crosswalk to west side of 31st to help signal timing and provide consistency for Pedestrians

View Option Three Alternatives

Integration with Other Plans and Projects

The study identified relevant plans and projects that will impact the project area. These plans included:

  • US-24 Environmental Assessment
  • Proposed Roundabout at Fontanero Blvd and 31st Street
  • 31st Street Drainage Channel Improvements and related street changes
  • Removal of On-Street Bike Lanes, Trail incorporated in drainage channel

Next steps

The project team is actively working to create a recommendation for traffic improvements which will be presented at a public meeting July 24, 2019.

Public Outreach and Neighborhood Input

Previous Public Outreach Efforts

  • Stakeholder meeting: The team identified a group of stakeholders to engage and provide meaningful input to the project through meetings at milestone decision points. Stakeholders groups included:
    • Neighborhood representatives
    • A representative from the Active Transportation Advisory Committee (ATAC)
    • Business owners
    • CDOT representative
  • Neighborhood meeting: April 23, 2019

La Salle Street / Madison Street Traffic Calming Meeting

The City of Colorado Springs has scheduled a public meeting to discuss traffic calming applications for Madison St. and La Salle St. The focus of the discussion will be for the section between Paseo Rd. and Union Blvd. with the intent to increase delay along the roadways to deter speeding and cut-through traffic.

As a resident and/or property owner in this neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements., you are invited and encouraged to attend this meeting. Feel free to share this notice with a neighbor or anyone else who may be interested in attending. If the weather becomes a concern, cancelation updates can be found on our website at coloradosprings.gov/ntmp.  Please contact us with questions or comments at (719) 385-7607 or by e-mail at epurcell@springsgov.com.

Meeting Location: Patty Jewett Club House, 900 E Espanola St.

Date and Time: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at 6 p.m.

*If you are unable to attend, a copy of the full presentation given will be posted on our web page at coloradosprings.gov/ntmp.

Event dates

Location Patty Jewett Golf Course Clubhouse (map)
900 East Espanola Street
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
Date/Time Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 6:00pm

Deliverance Dr./Reuben Dr. Traffic Calming Meeting

The City of Colorado Springs has scheduled a public meeting to discuss the imminent closure of Reuben Dr., between Montarbor Dr. and Deliverance Dr.  The focus of the discussion will be to share our design for this closure and to answer any questions the residents of the neighborhoodA geographic sub-area within the city that contains but is not limited to residential land uses. The extent of a neighborhood is variable and may be defined by tradition, organizational boundaries, period of building and development, or subdivision patterns. Neighborhood boundaries may include such features as major streets or other physical elements. may have.

As a resident and/or property owner in this neighborhood, you are invited and encouraged to attend this meeting. Feel free to share this notice with a neighbor or anyone else who may be interested in attending. If the weather becomes a concern, cancellation updates can be found on our website at coloradosprings.gov/ntmp.  Please contact us with questions or comments at (719) 385-7607 or by e-mail at epurcell@springsgov.com.

Event dates

Location King Elementary School (map)
6110 Sapporo Dr.
Colorado Springs, CO 80918
Date/Time Monday, April 22, 2019 - 6:00pm

Red light camera safety program goes live at two intersections Tuesday, April 9

30-day education period begins for safety program designed to curb dangerous driving

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Red light safety cameras will be implemented at two Colorado Springs intersections in an effort to prevent dangerous red-light running. The “Red Light Safety Camera Program” aims to protect drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians from injuries or crashes caused by red-light running. The program commences April 9 and will begin with a 30-day warning period before a $75 fine is implemented. Traffic safety cameras will be implemented at four intersections with the remaining two intersections slated to go live later this spring.

Intersections to go live April 9

East Platte Avenue @ Chelton Road
Eastbound Approach 

Briargate Boulevard @ Lexington Boulevard
Westbound Approach

Intersections to go live this spring

Academy Boulevard @ North Carefree Circle
Northbound Approach 

Academy Boulevard @ Dublin Boulevard
Southbound Approach

A total of 10 red light safety cameras will be installed at locations throughout Colorado Springs with the remaining six intersections to be identified and installed in the future.

CSPD implements 30-day warning period

Beginning April 9 through May 8, motorists captured by the red light cameras running a red light will be issued a written warning by mail. Only drivers who ENTER the intersection AFTER the light has turned red will get a ticket. Any verified violations captured at the first two intersections on May 9 or later will be issued a citation with a fine of $75 (no points will be assessed).

With each new intersection to use this technology, a new 30-day warning period will take effect before fines will be issued.

Cameras operate 24-hours-a-day and capture images of vehicles when they run a red light at an intersection. Violations are issued after police personnel confirm a violation has occurred. Signs posted along the street will alert drivers that red-light safety cameras are in use at the intersection ahead. For more information about the program visit www.ColoradoSprings.gov/RedLightSafety.

 “2018 witnessed the highest number of traffic fatalities in Colorado Springs. Intersections can be one of the most dangerous places in the city for drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists,” said Colorado Springs Police Chief Vince Niski. “Our goal is to reduce the number of red-light runners, thus decreasing the number of violations and their potential for crashes and injuries on our roadways. We want drivers in Colorado Springs to stop on red, drive attentively and follow the rules of the road.”

The automated red-light safety camera enforcement program works to change driver behavior through increased enforcement of red light laws and increased public awareness of red-light running.

Data shows that red-light safety cameras can change driving behavior and City officials chose the locations after evaluating several factors including crash data and where the technology would have the most impact.

Colorado Springs contracts with Verra Mobility as their red-light safety camera vendor. Verra Mobility is the leading provider of red-light and speed camera enforcement programs across North America.

View the Red Light Safety Camera Fact Sheet (pdf)

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New engineering manager for traffic operations named

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.—Local traffic engineer and transportation manager, Todd Frisbie, has been named the new Engineering Manager for Traffic Operations for the City of Colorado Springs. Frisbie comes to the City with more than 22 years of experience in transportation planning and engineering.

“Todd has the background and experience to help shape the future of transportation in the City of Colorado Springs.  His measured approach and ability to work with others towards solutions will be welcomed.  I am confident that he will serve Colorado Springs with respect, and will improve the quality of life in our city,” said Travis Easton, Public Works Director for the City of Colorado Springs.

Frisbie brings private sector experience in transportation planning and traffic engineering.  As a registered professional civil engineer, Frisbie has worked on many public infrastructure projects and has developed good working relationships with the City of Colorado Springs and adjacent municipalities and jurisdictions.  Frisbie has served on the City’s Transportation Advisory Board (CTAB) since 2017, which advises City Council on multi-modal transportation systems. Frisbie will start the position April 1.

The Engineering Manager for Traffic Operations reports to the Public Works Director and is responsible for management of the transportation systems and traffic operations within the city in accordance with federal and state regulations and City Code. The Traffic Operations Division oversees signal operations, transportation planning, the traffic operations center, and is staffed by 27 budgeted employees with a 2019 department budget of $17.7 million.

Red Light Safety Camera FAQs

How are red-light safety camera intersections determined?

Intersections throughout the city were carefully reviewed to determine which intersections would enhance safety the most with red light cameras. Intersections were not selected simply on highest volume or highest crash data, they were selected based on a combination of factors that not only number of crashes, but severity of crashes to put all intersections on equal playing field despite differences in traffic volume.

How many cameras will be installed?

A total of 10 red light safety cameras will be installed at locations throughout Colorado Springs with the remaining six intersections to be identified and installed in the future.

Why does the camera flash when no one actually runs the red light?

Occasionally, a vehicle may trigger one of the two cameras when coming to a rapid stop, yet not entering the intersection. Additionally, a vehicle may approach the intersection but only slow, rather than stop, before continuing to turn, triggering the road safety program and causing the flash to discharge.

Importantly, all flash incidents do not equate to a citation. Each violation event captured by the red-light safety camera is reviewed by staff who will make a final determination about the issuance of a citation.

How much will this program cost Colorado Springs and its taxpayers?

The road safety camera program is set up to be fully funded through fines paid by red-light runners. Taxpayers are not being asked to pay for this system. Any additional revenues above the cost to operate the program will go into the City’s general fund, not CSPD.

As driver behavior changes and crashes diminish in number, the city and residents could see a reduction in emergency services and other community expenses. According to the Federal Highway Administration, by reducing crashes, red-light safety cameras annually save communities $39,000 to $50,000 in collision-related expenses per location. 

What company maintains the red light safety cameras and provides the Road Safety Program in Colorado Springs? 

Colorado Springs has contracted with Verra Mobility which provides more than 300 communities across North American with red-light and speed safety camera programs. More information about Verra Mobility is available at www.VerraMobility.com


 

Paving season wraps up with completion of final road work

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – As the third 2C paving season comes to a close, Colorado Springs drivers can enjoy a total of 222.5 newly-paved lane miles, thanks to the 2C ballot measure passed in 2015. Despite the recent winter-like weather, crews anticipate completing the final roadways to receive 2C paving by Oct. 26, weather dependent.

“With the 2C initiative now more than halfway complete, we are really seeing the positive impact of this $50 million a year investment in our local infrastructure,” said Mayor John Suthers. “The funding from this critical local ballot measure has resurfaced nearly 700 lane miles since 2016, and while there is still much work to be done, 2C has allowed us to take important steps to improve the overall condition of our streets.”

The effort is funded through a temporary five-year $0.62 sales tax approved by Colorado Springs voters in Nov. 2015 used solely for roadway repairs. Paving efforts occur in tandem with continued PPRTA projects that provide routine preventative maintenance to help roads achieve their full life span.

Crews are actively finishing the following roadways to receive 2C paving in 2018:

  • 24th Street from Cul-De-Sac to Wolff Place, Wolff Place to Uintah Street, and Uintah Street to Pikes Peak Avenue
  • Walnut Street from Boulder Boulevard to Bijou Street, and Bijou Street to Colorado Avenue
  • Institute Street from San Rafael Street to Cache la Poudre Street
  • North Carefree Circle from Peterson Road to Powers Boulevard, Powers Boulevard to Oro Blanco Drive

Contractors completed the 2018 pre-overlay concrete list and 18 percent of the 2019 list. Curb and gutter work is required prior to repaving as any deficiency in this infrastructure creates risk of water and structural damage, which would significantly lessen the lifespan of any new streets. Further, sidewalk work was completed ahead of paving to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which requires that any time a street is repaired or repaved, ADA accessibility must be brought up to current standards.

Tax revenues collected by the 0.62 percent sales tax portion are placed in a separate fund which is overseen by the City Auditor’s office and used exclusively for road, sidewalk, curb and gutter improvements. Further, a citizen committee convenes quarterly to review operations, expenditures and quality control. Any and all funds remaining by the end of 2018 will roll into 2C construction for future years.

2018 Colorado Springs complete paving operations and concrete work

The following are milestones reached by 2018 paving operations and concrete work. Unless specified otherwise, the below numbers include combined funding from 2C, Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority (PPRTA) and City of Colorado Springs general funds:

  • Paved 222.5 lane miles under Ballot 2C
  • Replaced 137,891.9 linear feet of curb and gutter
  • Replaced 288,423.48 square feet sidewalk
  • Installed 150 new pedestrian ramps
  • Retrofitted 843 existing pedestrian ramps
  • Placed more than 150,614.02 tons of asphalt

In addition, the public works operations and maintenance division performed much needed routine maintenance on several roadways in 2018.

  • 108.37 lane miles of chip seal preventative maintenance under PPRTA
  • 267.83 lane miles of crack seal preventative maintenance under PPRTA

Public Works estimates 224.67 lane miles will be paved in 2019, and the final list will be released in the coming months. For more information about voter-supported 2C projects visit ColoradoSprings.gov/2C. Click here to view an interactive map highlighting all public works projects, including stormwater, capital improvements, paving and roadway maintenance, traffic engineering and transit.